Posted in camel and climate change, Camelization of other continent, Climate Change Adaptation, Natural Health and Camel Milk, new strategies,, Uncategorized

Camel’s Milk Gives Hopes in the Drought Stricken Africa

When it’s too dry for dairy cows, what do you do? Switch to camel milk

The African nomads find new ways to adapt with the challenge of the climate change. As increasingly fierce, frequent and lengthy dry spells hit northern Kenya, raising dairy cattle has gotten ever harder. But after seeing her initial five camels thrive while eating just tree branches and leaves, Yousef sold 100 cows to buy more expensive camels, whose milk now never dries up.ken_camelmilk5_Safia_kulow

To read the complete report and other details, please click on the links below.

  1. https://news.trust.org/item/20160510140654-f50hy/
  2. Camel Milk Materializing Education for the Drought Stricken Kenyan Pastoralists

Camel is really a very crucial and precious creature playing a pivotal role to materialize livelihood in the hardiest terrains of the world in the harshest environmental conditions. Camel has the unique power of adaptability and is considered as the best answer to the climate change calamities. Camel! A One in All Creatures.

Posted in camel and climate change, Diabetes, hepatitis, Natural Health and Camel Milk, Symbiosis, Uncategorized

Recommendation by Christina Adam (A Writer/journalist, autism expert, camel milk advisor)

Dr. Raziq is an emerging global visionary. From his background in animal science and hands-on experimentation, he realized the value of camel milk as an exceptional productDr Abdul Raziq Kakar Technical Operation Manager at a Modern Camel Dairy Farm.raziq

But he also had the foresight to view pastoral peoples as valuable cultural reservoirs. He’s a consistent and admired advocate for camels and pastoral knowledge, with deep traditional knowledge of native livestock breeds, husbandry and health systems.He works to sustain animal health and pr1a4e28eoduction with a commendable natural approach. As a technical advisor for a large camel diary, he helps drive modern milk usage. His leadership has helped raise awareness of camel milk and it’s my pleasure to consult him as a top camel resource. He is a valued leader in policy planning for the international camel community.

To see her work and contribution in our camels’ world, please go to the linkChristina Adams Writer/journalist, autism expert, camel milk advisor

Posted in camel and climate change, Camelization of other continent, Climate Change Adaptation, Diabetes, hepatitis, Natural Health and Camel Milk, Uncategorized

Camel Milk Materializing Education for the Drought Stricken Kenyan Pastoralists

Isiolo, a provincial town about five hours’ drive north of the capital, Nairobi, has become a real camel hub already. Maalim and around thirty other women now bring about five thousand liters of camel milk daily to a distribution point in the center of the provincial town. The women receive support from the Dutch development organization SNV, which helped them finance a cooling tank. “Thanks to the profits of the camel milk I can send my eight children to school, and one even goes to university,” Maalim says, as she hands in her plastic yellow jerry cans full of camel milk.Kenyans turn to camels to cope with climate changecamel milk Africa

Currently, the milk is transported in passenger buses. But as the milk frequently gets stolen or goes bad when buses break down, the women are trying to get a loan to buy a cooling truck to transport the milk to Nairobi. “We also have plans to produce yogurt, pack our products and to export to Somalia,” she says and adds that an international airport has recently been opened near Isiolo. “We are facing a bright future – thanks to camel milk.”Kenyan pastoralist

For further reading, please go to the link below;

http://www.dw.com/en/kenyans-turn-to-camels-to-cope-with-climate-change/a-38300987

 

Posted in camel and climate change, Camelization of other continent, Climate Change Adaptation, Diabetes, hepatitis, Natural Health and Camel Milk, Symbiosis, Uncategorized, Vegan

Happy Camels vs the Sad Cow: A comprehensive Response from Julia.

This comment was written by Julia Marie Bell Julia Marie Bell from Australia in response to the comments of Simpson on my blog Happy Camel vs the Sad Cow.

She writes as “My argument leading on from my earlier statements, regarding why Simpson’s conclusion which explicitly implies “do not drink camel’s milk” is unsound is twofold. Firstly from a philosophical perspective and secondly from a scientific perspective.
It is well documented the symbiotic relationship between humans and the non-human world. The necessity, joy, physical and psychological health benefits. This is not new; it is ancient wisdom which is still traveling the world. It is not the “keeping” of non-human animals, be it for food or pleasure but MORE significant how the creatures are kept and how they are killed! My argument for free range and so forth. Furthermore, if one cannot kill an animal, one should therefore not eat the animal. This is ethical and puts one in a special relationship to such animal.
I ask you, Simpson, do you eat meat or any products from an animal? Do you wear leather or wool? By virtue of being “human “, we have all crossed this boundary.
I agree that the killing for killing’s sake, and using the non-human world for human greed, sexual exploitation and money is evil.
My position comes from “Deep Ecology” and an environmental ethic. So it is not wrong to drink any form of milk! It is the way the milk is collected. There is this western MYTH that infiltrated our psyche claiming that milk is unhealthy and causing cruelty in the production. Firstly, it is the pasteurization and homogenization that is killing us and creating allergies and gut problems. You can Google evidence for my claims. Secondly, I agree that many animals are kept in cruel conditions for milking and have their calves taken. This is too general a statement. That inductive reasoning is fallacious.
Camels milk is produced quite differently. I have visited many camel farms that produce milk and they are free range, stress-free and the calves are only taken for short periods, if at all.
An important environmental point is that “soft hooved” animals (camels) are far more environmentally sustainable than “hard hooved” animals.
It is well documented the medicinal properties of camel’s milk! Please research. It is this symbiotic, beautiful relationship that I am talking about. There does not have to be cruelty. Understand through Science what the non-human world, the sentient and non-sentient world has to offer is magnificent and awe inspiring. Many of our medical discoveries and medicines have been achieved this way. That is why we need to embrace and nurture, not have “dominion over”.
I am, for the most part, a vegetarian. I only eat what I can kill. Chicken and fish. I drink camel’s milk straight from the camel. I try and reduce and be aware of my carbon footprint. I do this as I am responsible for my health and well being and try not to consume too much of the health dollar. I am extremely healthy and strong in comparison to many of similar age. Food is medicine and we ought to understand this.
Finally, Simpson your opinion (and that is all it is) if fraught with paradoxes and smacks of “yuppie” ideology, giving very little understanding not only of poor countries that are kept alive on camels milk but furthermore the wonderful life-enhancing gifts that the beloved camel has to offer.”

 

Posted in Camelization of other continent, Natural Health and Camel Milk, Uncategorized

Camel Journey~ Some More Updates from Australia

In previous article I told you about the camel work in Australia shared by Hannah Purs. Here are some more updates by her again. She wrote as;

Camel Introduction to Australia

Camels were introduced and adapted by Afghan cameleers in Australia. That time almost 20000 camels along with 2000 cameleers were brought to Australia for different purposes of work. The details can be seen in the link below.

http://www.cameleers.net/

Australia is blessed to be home to the world’s largest population of free roaming dromedary camels, animals that have been effectively quarantined against typical camel ailments found in the rest of the world since the early 1900s. In 2008 Desert Knowledge, an Alice Springs based organization, put together an estimate of wild camel numbers in Australia, they spread far and wide that there was around 1 million camels in Australia. Later on camel shooting suggestion came on the ground.20150225_111411

For details please go to the link;

http://www.businessinsider.com.au/some-bad-advice-on-wild-camel-numbers-may-have-cost-the-federal-government-millions-in-cash-exports-and-jobs-2013-11

IMG_0179

Camel Milk for Australia

Camel milk is in such high demand in Australia that it was being resold at $200 a litre on Gumtree (on online trading site) in November 2014. There is anecdotal and scientific evidence suggesting that camel milk can be invaluable in treating a number of diseases; from autoimmune issues to diabetes and renal problems to autism to therapy for those with cancer. Hannah Training Camel from DairyA camel milk project was then desigend and implemented to harvest this untapped resource of camel milk in Australia. This project has constantly reassessed its targets.

For details, please go to the link below.

http://www.camelmilkaus.com

In an email, she wrote further as concluding remarks as ‘

Some of the challenges that we’ve faced so far are:
Local people not wanting camels in the area
Government legislation changes
The cost of starting a dairy
Achievements:
Developing a training method which allows us to train camels very fast with no ropes or halters
Creating conversation within the Australian media about camels and their value
Posted in Uncategorized

Camel Journey ~ From its Original Habitat to Modern World

Camel role is incredible in its cradle of domestication and its original habitats. In the 19th Century, some camels were transported to USA, Australia, and some other places for work and armies. After automobile revolution, the role of the camel as a beast of burden was gradually diminished 1,2.

In Australia there are thousands of feral camels, now it’s estimated a million, roaming across Australian deserts but unfortunately considered as a pest. Government launches project to kill camel (considering as a pest) and save the scarce water resources in the region 3. Many friends from Australia and other parts of the world (including the author) raised voice to halt such killing which results in wastage of such a unique resource. The camel activists gave many good arguments/suggestions to save feral camel; a tool to adapt to the climate change and judiciously use of the scattered bushy vegetation of the region 4. Unfortunately, there are still many challenges, the main one is the weak faith and poor understanding of the present Australian government on the onset of climate change 5.

I appreciate the role of the colleagues and friends around the world who raised voice for the conservation of camel in Australia and converting camel from a useless animal to the best tool for adaptation to climate change and ensuring food security. Now my dream about camel ‘Turning from a beast of burden to a modern farm animal’ is turning true 6Camel is Turning from a Beast of Burden to a Modern Farm Animal

In this series of articles, I am starting to share links, photographs, and views of the people around the world, who floated the idea to sustainable use of camel for the well being of humanity. Modern science also proved the role of the camel in all aspects especially, food security, sustainability, resilience and adaptation to climate change and human health. All friends and colleagues are warmly welcome to freely review, comments, share in this series of knowledge sharing.

As a first innovation, I hereby share pictures sent by Hannah Purs from Australia. I hope she will respond to reviewers.

20150414_173557

Hannah Training Camel from Dairy

Camel Feeding on Hay

SONY DSC
Feral camels are gathered by Helicopter

References 

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Camel_Corps
  2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_feral_camel
  3. http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/06/09/australia-considers-killing-camels-to-tackle-climate-change/
  4. http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/news/hannah-purss-embarks-on-2000km-camels-for-drought-relief-trek-along-oodnadatta-track/story-fngr8gwi-1226926025959
  5. http://rt.com/news/256861-climate-change-un-hoax/
  6. https://camel4milk.wordpress.com/2014/11/01/camel-is-turning-from-a-beast-of-burden-to-a-modern-farm-animal/
Posted in Uncategorized

Kenya’s dairy industry switches from cowsW to camels | Global Ideas

The cow is the most important farm animal in parts of Africa but climate change is threatening the existence of the animal. Recurring droughts and extreme heat are making cows unable to produce essential milk. Camel produces milk in harsh conditions where other farm animals are hard to survive. In Kenya, a group of farmers has found an alternative in camel milk.

20150506_083133[1]

Unlike cows, camels can withstand long periods of extreme drought and still produce milk all year round. Some 200 women have already made the switch from cow to camel milk. The camel milk is healthier and pleasant in taste. The move has improved living conditions for many, especially because they are able to sell milk from their camels at a competitive price. For more go to http://www.dw.de/dw/0,,11487,00.htm

The link of the video tube reported by Deutsche Welle is available below.

with courtesy to DW

Posted in Arya Warsha, Bactria

Camel Ensures Sustainable Productivity

The atrocities of climate change are emerging with multi-dimensional outcomes in different parts of the world with different intensities and level of losses. The historical Bactria region1 (Also, Arya) is one of the worst affected ecosystems. 800px-Greco-BactrianKingdomMapThis region is the historical home place of some very precious livestock species and cradle of domestication2. The region is the birthplace of Bactrian camel, Yak, sheep, goat, and horses. The regions are well known for its sheep and cattle culture mainly depending on grasses. In the due course of speedy climate change, the rangelands of the region lost many grass varieties and quantity produced per unit of land. Low rain falls, erratic rains, rains beyond proper timing are the main drivers of the climate change and hot spells are catalysts in this regards.camel pic

The sheep and cattle industry of the indigenous breeds is under threat. The drought cycles hit the region resulted in the loss of the sheep and cattle. Three species like Camel, goat and donkey are the most resilience to this climate change. Camel is unique because of the long walking ability and resistance to water & feed scarcity as their special traits. 254498_10150251489644743_5372734_n

A camel can be a good player if explored to ensure food security in such a climate change scenario because of special traits. Unfortunately, the policy makers of the region have never placed camel at its proper place while fabricating policy regarding agricultural development. Authors have striven for years to bring camel in the mainstream of the policy makers but yet need more to be done.

For further reading;

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20141107170939-85443832-a-precious-sheep-culture-is-under-threat

References

1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bactria

2.http://livestockscience.in/wp-content/uploads/2011/slutversion_after_revision_av_Raigi_camel_till_J_Livestock_science.pdf

Posted in Natural Health and Camel Milk

Challenges of Climate Change~ Camels’ Adaptation Strategy is Overwhelmingly Useful

Camel has adapted mechanisms that allow it to withstand prolonged water deprivation, high temperature, especially in the absence of readily available water, and survive when feed resources are scarce or of poor quality. Heat tolerance is in part due to its’ ability to minimize water loss. The camel retort to hot arid conditions by reducing urine production, absorbed urine, sweating economically, by an increase body temperature and by the ‘storage’ of CO2 and glucose in the muscles. Camels can survive up to 14 days without water and can tolerate water losses of up to 30%. A camel may drink more than a third of its body weight as it rehydrates.

The camel’s blood plays a principal role in adaptive mechanisms to high heat burden and dehydration as its composition and volume remains relatively constant and hemoglobin function remains normal. The erythrocytes of the camel are oval shaped and non-nucleated which resist osmotic variation without rupturing; these cells can swell to twice their initial volume following rehydration. Another unique feature of the erythrocytes is their long life span when the camel is dehydrated. The life span of the erythrocytes of hydrated camels is 90 to 120 days. When camels were chronically dehydrated during summer (40oC mean during day; 20oC mean at night) the life span of erythrocytes was extended to 150 days. Erythrocyte turnover is water and energy expensive. Therefore extending the life span of erythrocytes reduces energy and water expenditure

 Featured Image -- 35

A fully hydrated camel has a diurnal body temperature range of 36 to 38oC. However when dehydrated and exposed to high environmental heat load body temperature may fluctuate by 6 to 7oC, from approximately 34 to 41o C. The increase in body temperature of camels exposed to high heat load, especially following a 2o C reduction below the normal minimum, is advantageous because it allows a considerable amount of heat to be stored during the day and dissipated at night (by radiation) without the expenditure of water. Furthermore, as body temperature increases the temperature gradient between the camel and the external environment is reduced, and again water use is reduced. The camel has a bi-phasic air flow pattern, i.e. the inspiratory and expiratory flow rates through the nasal turbinate are similar. The bi-phasic breathing pattern also reduces water use.

As obvious the main atrocities of climate change are raise in temperature, low rainfall (short of vegetation and drinking water) and sand storms etc, all challenges are accepted by camel with the mechanism of adaptation. Camel can be wisely use as a main strategic tool to while fabricating policies to adapt with the climate change.  I hereby stress the policy makers to consider on the true worth of this unique and strange animal.

Posted in camel and climate change, Climate Change Adaptation, Natural Health and Camel Milk, Uncategorized

Camel! A One in All Creatures

One can imagine, how distinctive and special can be the gift of God. The Bedouin gives name Ata Allah (gift of God), hence considered as precious and matchless. Nevertheless, of its products, camels’ physiology, and behavior is specially designed to survive in harsh conditions of its habitat and sustain the livelihood of its keepers in climate change scenario. Camel has all the characteristics which are otherwise scattered in all the other known and useful animals. The following table shows the importance of camel if compared to other livestock species. Livestock vs camel. Every product of camel is useful, even urine (traditionally use for medicinal conditions like the ear infection, water belly and some kinds of dermatitis) and dung are valuable.Camels’ Manure~From Waste to a Worthwhile Farming Agent

camel picThe long bones of camel are very attractive for nomads’ women and use for making jewelry. The camel rearing communities have very firm links with camel culture and consider this special creature as part and parcel of their heritage and culture.

Camel is full of qualities and strange abilities. The author has tried to compile some of the special attributes known to humankind so for. The attributes are grouped in main subjects and given in numeric order.

Potential and Availability of Camel Milk (CM)

  • Camel is the only livestock species which was originally domesticated for milk; God gifted the camel to Prophet Saleh (PBUH) for milk only, almost 3500 BC.
  • Camel is the only animal of dry lands which can produce up to 40-liter milk per day (some specimens are recorded) in ordinary grazing conditions. Such high yielding specimens are found in Sub-continent, Arabian Peninsula, Africa and other parts of the dromedary camels’ habitats.
  • It is the most efficient animal in milk production on per unit feed/water consumption basis, i.e. a cow in rangelands conditions needs 9.1 kg of dry matter feed to produce one liter of milk, while camel produces one liter of milk by consuming only 1.9 kg of dry matter feed in the same conditions.
  • The lengthy days without water couldn’t depress the camel’s milk quantity or quality. The milk becomes even more watery during the period of water scarcity to fulfill the water requirements of thirsty suckling calves.
  • Camels’ lactation ranges from 9 to 18 month and produces up to 12,000 liters/lactation.

raziq

CM is Natural Pharmacy

  1. A Superfood

A gift of nature and gold of desert, the camel milk (CM) is miraculously proving as a superfood. Because of the appreciable level and unique combination of nutrients (minerals, vitamins, protein, and fatty acids etc.). CM has medicinal properties covering a wide range of ailments like autoimmune diseases, allergies, asthma, rashes, diabetes, liver disorders, rheumatism, inflammatory conditions, piles, urethral irritation, infectious diseases, stress/depression, peptic ulcers and even cancer. The nomads/Bedouins have a long history of experience while healing such diseases with the CM. The manifolds enriched levels of minerals (potassium, magnesium, iron, copper, manganese, sodium and zinc) than cow milk, making it a real superfood.

2. An Attraction for Mature people

Camel milk is use as the aphrodisiac, especially in the stressful conditions of the dry hot weather. The appealing level of Nanobodies in CM making it very special tonic for making the mood. As well as CM is a nervine tonic and helps in good eyesight. The pastoral people depending on camel milk rarely get weak eyesight.

3. A Beauty Tonic

The content of niacin (Vitamin B3) in camel milk is remarkably higher than in cow milk. Vitamin B3 supports the function of the digestive system, skin, and nerves, and improves circulation making it a beauty and health tonic. Camel milk contains five times more vitamin C compared to cow milk. Vitamin C is anti-infectious and is very important for human health, especially in dry and deserted areas.Displaying DSC_0133.jpg

4. Full Stop to Diabetes

Camel milk contains insulin-like protein and is therefore used to treat Diabetes mellitus. Such insulin is capsulated in fats molecules which cannot be denatured (does not coagulate easily because of fat coating) in the acidic medium of a stomach. Such property of Camel milk enhances protein absorption.A study of the anti-diabetic agents of camel milk

5. Ensures Super immune system

The wonderful protein of CM (protective amino acids and immunoglobulin) is a booster of the immune system and nutritional advantages for brain development. CM contains 25-30 times as much lactoferrin as cow milk. Lactoferrin is a fairly recently discovered iron-containing protein that has been shown to have antiviral, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-carcinogenic effects. Therefore, a combination of lactoferrin (bactericidal and iron-binding properties) and lysozyme (an enzyme which catalyzes the destruction of the cell walls of certain bacteria) ensure super immune system. A recent study revealed that camel milk has anti-genotoxic (prevent toxification in gene and prevent mutation) and anti-cytotoxic (prevent toxification in the cell). The Nanobodies play an incredible role in this regard.Superfood (Camel Milk) can Beat the Challenge of Superbug (Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics)

6. A Dedication to the children

Children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) responding positively after therapy that included camel milk. The low quantity of beta casein and the lack of beta-lactoglobulin are linked to the hypo-allergic effects of camel milk. Because of the low lactose content, it does not cause lactose intolerance problem in infants. CM has 100 times more D-Lactate as compared to cow milk. D-Lactate is very health promising contrary to L-lactate which is toxic and causes an allergy found in cows’ milk. Camel milk can be the best replacement of infant food after the mother’s breast because of its child-friendly lactose.Camels’ Milk Miracle for Autistic Patients

Image result for camel milk miracle for autistic patients
Christina Adam is a living story of treating her autistic son with camel milk

 

7. The Bucket of Healthy Fatty Acids

Camels’ milk fat contains the much higher concentration of long-chained fatty acids (C 14 – C 18) than short-chained fatty acids and is, therefore, healthier. The Omega 3 and Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) are even more important among the other fatty acids. CM have 3 times more Omega 3 and CLA than naturally grazing cows’ milk. Such compounds are attracting young generations to be kept healthy and attractive.Easy Understandable But Important Features of Camel Milk

Camel Meat is Special

  1. Camel meat is healthier as they produce carcasses with less fat as well as having fewer levels of cholesterol in fat than other meat animals.
  2. Camel meat is also relatively high in polyunsaturated fatty acid in comparison to beef. This is an important factor in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.
  3. Camel meat is also used for remedial purposes for diseases such as hyperacidity, hypertension, pneumonia and respiratory disease as well as an aphrodisiac.
  4. Camels reach live weights of about 650 kg at 7–8 years of age and produce carcass weights ranging from 125 to 400 kg with dressing-out percentage values from 55% to 70%. Camel carcasses contain about 57% muscle, 26% bone and 17% fat.
  5. Camel lean meat contains about 77% water, 19% protein, 2.8% fat, and 1.2% ash with a small amount of intramuscular fat, which renders it a healthy food for humans.
  6. Camel meat has been described as raspberry red to dark brown in color and the fat of the camel meat is white.
  7. The amino acid and mineral contents of camel meat are often higher than beef, probably due to lower intramuscular fat levels.
  8. Camel meat has been processed into burgers, patties, sausages and shawarma to add value.
  9. Because of its low cholesterol content, Australia’s National Heart Foundation has put camel meat on its list of highly recommended food items. “Camburgers” and “camfurters” are among the products that have been produced by a team of scientists around Prof. Farah at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology.

    15241932_1214500025292205_8398054155220119305_n
    A tribal Baloch is a traditional rider.

Camel has Great Ride and Unique Training Ability

  1. The ears are small but have a great power of hearing. Camel can hear and understand the voice of its header from a long distance.
  2. The camels are regarded as the most intelligent animals and can find out their way in the desert when there are no signs of the road.
  3. Camels can travel many days without feed or water. In the kind of terrain, I like to ride in, this is a very important factor.
  4. A traveler can continue the journey without bothering too much about the feed and water. Camel eats each and everything when tired and hungry.
  5. The long muscular legs allow camels to cover great distances, they walk up to 40 km per day with 200 to 300 kg of baggage.
  6. Camel is better as riding animal than the horse. They are quieter and gentler than horses.
  7. Camels seem smarter than horses about getting themselves out of a precarious situation. If a horse gets tangled up in a rope, it may struggle violently and get rope burns (or worse). A tangled up camel will, after briefly testing the bonds, sit quietly and figure out what to do next.
  8. Camels can carry more weight than horses. Also, a well-designed camel saddle has more room to carry whatever extra gear you are packing than a horse saddle has.
  9. Riding a camel is quiet and peaceful (that is, once the camel is well trained enough that it no longer grumbles along the way). Camel’s slipper-like feet make hardly any noise. Without the clip-clop of hooves, you can hear the wind sighing in the brush, the rustle of autumn leaves, a coyote howl in the distance on a moonlight ride.
  10. The camel gets in high spirits to the tune of music and songs and it walks faster in spite of being tired.
  11. The camels are the most disciplined and obedient creatures. They and can be ordered to sit or stand again and again and can walk in a row silently behind the leading man, woman or even a child.
  12. The camel is a unique beast of burden, which is loaded in sitting position and gets up with a jerk of its long neck.
  13. Camels do not need to be shod. The cost of shoeing horses can really add up! Furthermore, camels don’t usually colic like horses do, although they occasionally bloat.
  14. There is a certain pride in riding a well-trained camel. It is a sign of prestige for camel owner to ride and travel on a mehari camel.

    Image result for camel picture raziq landscape nature biodiversity
    Going back to the mountains from a camel gathering of socio-economic interest

Disease Resistance Trait of Camel Making its Products Residue Free 

  1. Camel is resistant to ticks diseases. A load of more than 100 ticks on camel body cannot affect camel health and production.
  2. White Kohi camel is called as Syed by its herders as; having high potential to resist fly bite disease (Trypanosomiasis) The disease register of the camel is quite short (very few fatal diseases are reported in camel).
  3. Camel is resistant to many notorious diseases like foot and mouth disease, mad cow disease (BSE) and Brucellosis etc.
  4. No clinical FMD is reported in camels from any part of the world.
  5. MERS has nothing with the camel as the vector but a tool of misinformation and propaganda.

Camel’s Unique Physiology 

The Browsing Beast

  1. The camel has a large mouth, with 34 sharp teeth. They enable the animal to eat rough thorny bushes without damaging the lining of its mouth.
  2. Camel can eat everything (bark, dates seed, salty mud, and even paper) when there is the scarcity of feed, while in good feeding conditions, it does prefer protein rich diet.
  3. The long flexible neck and legs save it from ground heat and give an easy approach to tall trees for browsing. Camel can browse at 3.5 m above the ground.
  4. The upper lip of the mouth has a cut in the middle. The flaps of the upper lip help in catching the twigs (thin shoots of the trees and bushes).
  5. The formation of the mouth is such that there are long conical papillae on the inside of the cheeks directed backward and the camel can browse at the thorny plants without any harm.
  6. The canine teeth help the camel to take into grip the twigs. Such kind of teeth is not found in other ruminants.
  7. The soft palate is developed and comes out on one side of the mouth like a red hanging bladder. This happens usually in rutting (breeding) seasons.

    Image result for browsing camels acacia raziq tree
    A strong Kohi camel in Suleiman Mountainous Region of Pakistan

Beast of Dryness and Water Economy

  1. Camel has a well-developed power to smell especially water sources. They can smell water 50 miles away by smelling geosmin which is a fragrance produced by streptomyces species growing in the dumped soil.
  2. Under very hot conditions, the camel may drink only every 8-10 days and loose up to 30% of its live body weight through dehydration. Other animals die at 10% live body loss through dehydration.
  3. Camel urinates less than 1 liter of urine per day in hot summer days. In the period of water scarcity, camel urinates a semi-liquid substance like syrup.
  4. Oval shape erythrocytes (instead of round in other animals) expand up to 200% their normal size as camels drink rapidly an amount of 190 liters of water in 10-15 minutes.
  5. Camel can store water in its all body compartments (intracellular, extracellular, blood and digestive tract etc). Every organ has the extraordinary capacity to store water.
  6. They can live without water for 3 days in summer and 7 days in winter. However, there are some examples of this animal remaining without water for 20 to 40 days. After 40 days the camel goes blind due to excessive dehydration.
  7. A camel can vary body temperature up to 6.7 Cº, having a great endurance power to stand the scorching heat. Camel even absorbs heat in the day time by increasing body temperature and dissipates it in the cool night, this way the camel conserves water.
  8. The well-developed hump is full of fat that serves as a store of water and food at the time of starvation. The fat of hump gets dissolved gradually during starvation and collects again at the time the camel gets adequate water and feed.

    Image result for camel hardiness in dry and harsh ecosystems raziq
    The Kharani breed of camel in Kharan deserted steepe in Balochistan

Prince of Sand and Ship of the Desert

  1. The flat pads of the feet are horny and cushioned and help the camel to walk on the sand without making any sound while the feet of other animals sink into the sand. Due to this quality, the camel has been given the name as the “ship of the desert“.
  2. Camel’s feet are soft and friendly to vegetation. The hooves of the cow or small ruminants are more aggressive to the soil and contribute more often to the degradation of the pastures in a case of overgrazing.
  3. The chest pad helps the animal to take rest on it while sitting on the ground. The rest of the body is saved from the concussion against the ground. There are other pads at the knee and half joint and in front of the joint of thighs. These prevent the limbs from the concussion against the ground.
  4. The spines of all vertebrates of the thoracic region are long & high and make the hump, which is more developed than all other Brahman cattle. Very special designed to be a useful animal in the desert.
  5. Camel has prominent eyes with a wide range of vision. They are protected by an overhanging upper lid with long eyelashes, which protect the eyeballs from powerful rays of the sun.
  6. The upper lip of the mouth has a cut in the middle enable the nostrils to cover to keep out the sand and dust at the time of dust storms.

    Image may contain: one or more people, people standing, sky, outdoor and nature
    The genius camel are enjoying the sand and the sun shine in winter. A snap from Arabian desert in UAE

Masculine Vulnerability-Paradox is Exceptional in Camels

  1. Bull is the main symbol of reproductive efficiency and very active in breeding season (camel is seasonal breeder and usually male shows sign of rut)
  2. The Bull urinates in gush while standing and urine goes back in between the hind legs and falls on the ground. Its refresh the femoral vein and decrease the heart temperature for water economy. This enables the animal to save itself from slipping in its urine.
  3. Another typical sign is a notably and profuse secretion of the poll glands of the neck, which contains androgen concentration similar to blood
  4.  The soft palate is filled with the air and a big red ball (dulla) is pumped out to attract the female, a very special behavior of camel bull.

    bull

Camel is still Hiding from the Eyes of Policy Makers

Besides all its attributes, camel is always considered as the beast of remotes and neglected among the policy makers. Its share is never praised and no visible effort has been done for its development. A camel can be a good tool in the global environmental changing scenario and food insecurity situation to provide food and livelihood to million of the people in the drylands of the world. Camels are very much under threat and up to 25 % of the camels are vanished in South and Central Asia, India. This decline is mainly because of the faulty national and regional policies resulting in restriction of historical routes and grazing lands. In recent years due to climate change, many challenging health issues are also causing threats to camels’ survival as this field is very dark and neglected. Only in the year 2010, thousands of camels were dead because of a fatal respiratory disease in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and India. This fatal disease comes time to time to eliminate numerous camel without being noticed by the health authorities of the concerned regions. Besides of many cries by the author and other friends, no positive response was attracted so far. A silver lining in the clouds is the organization of an advocacy group (Camels4Life) of like-minded people to work for the cause of camels’ keepers and to give them the proper place at a policy level and development projects application. I hereby appeal the national governments and international bodies like FAO, IFAD and other organization to give proper place to a camel in R&D sector of the agriculture.Al Ain doctor sees potential in camels beyond their milk