Camel! A One in All Creatures

Source: Camel! A One in All Creatures

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Camel’s Milk Gives Hopes in the Drought Stricken Africa

When it’s too dry for dairy cows, what do you do? Switch to camel milk

The African nomads find new ways to adapt with the challenge of the climate change. As increasingly fierce, frequent and lengthy dry spells hit northern Kenya, raising dairy cattle has gotten ever harder. But after seeing her initial five camels thrive while eating just tree branches and leaves, Yousef sold 100 cows to buy more expensive camels, whose milk now never dries up.ken_camelmilk5_Safia_kulow

To read the complete report and other details, please click on the links below.

  1. https://news.trust.org/item/20160510140654-f50hy/
  2. Camel Milk Materializing Education for the Drought Stricken Kenyan Pastoralists

Camel is really a very crucial and precious creature playing a pivotal role to materialize livelihood in the hardiest terrains of the world in the harshest environmental conditions. Camel has the unique power of adaptability and is considered as the best answer to the climate change calamities. Camel! A One in All Creatures.

Recommendation by Christina Adam (A Writer/journalist, autism expert, camel milk advisor)

Dr. Raziq is an emerging global visionary. From his background in animal science and hands-on experimentation, he realized the value of camel milk as an exceptional productDr Abdul Raziq Kakar Technical Operation Manager at a Modern Camel Dairy Farm.raziq

But he also had the foresight to view pastoral peoples as valuable cultural reservoirs. He’s a consistent and admired advocate for camels and pastoral knowledge, with deep traditional knowledge of native livestock breeds, husbandry and health systems.He works to sustain animal health and pr1a4e28eoduction with a commendable natural approach. As a technical advisor for a large camel diary, he helps drive modern milk usage. His leadership has helped raise awareness of camel milk and it’s my pleasure to consult him as a top camel resource. He is a valued leader in policy planning for the international camel community.

To see her work and contribution in our camels’ world, please go to the linkChristina Adams Writer/journalist, autism expert, camel milk advisor

Camel Milk Materializing Education for the Drought Stricken Kenyan Pastoralists

Isiolo, a provincial town about five hours’ drive north of the capital, Nairobi, has become a real camel hub already. Maalim and around thirty other women now bring about five thousand liters of camel milk daily to a distribution point in the center of the provincial town. The women receive support from the Dutch development organization SNV, which helped them finance a cooling tank. “Thanks to the profits of the camel milk I can send my eight children to school, and one even goes to university,” Maalim says, as she hands in her plastic yellow jerry cans full of camel milk.Kenyans turn to camels to cope with climate changecamel milk Africa

Currently, the milk is transported in passenger buses. But as the milk frequently gets stolen or goes bad when buses break down, the women are trying to get a loan to buy a cooling truck to transport the milk to Nairobi. “We also have plans to produce yogurt, pack our products and to export to Somalia,” she says and adds that an international airport has recently been opened near Isiolo. “We are facing a bright future – thanks to camel milk.”Kenyan pastoralist

For further reading, please go to the link below;

http://www.dw.com/en/kenyans-turn-to-camels-to-cope-with-climate-change/a-38300987

 

Happy Camels vs the Sad Cow: A comprehensive Response from Julia.

An important environmental point is that “soft hooved” animals (camels) are far more environmentally sustainable than “hard hooved” animals.

This comment was written by Julia Marie Bell Julia Marie Bell from Australia in response to the comments of Simpson on my blog Happy Camel vs the Sad Cow.

She writes as “My argument leading on from my earlier statements, regarding why Simpson’s conclusion which explicitly implies “do not drink camel’s milk” is unsound is twofold. Firstly from a philosophical perspective and secondly from a scientific perspective.
It is well documented the symbiotic relationship between humans and the non-human world. The necessity, joy, physical and psychological health benefits. This is not new; it is ancient wisdom which is still traveling the world. It is not the “keeping” of non-human animals, be it for food or pleasure but MORE significant how the creatures are kept and how they are killed! My argument for free range and so forth. Furthermore, if one cannot kill an animal, one should therefore not eat the animal. This is ethical and puts one in a special relationship to such animal.
I ask you, Simpson, do you eat meat or any products from an animal? Do you wear leather or wool? By virtue of being “human “, we have all crossed this boundary.
I agree that the killing for killing’s sake, and using the non-human world for human greed, sexual exploitation and money is evil.
My position comes from “Deep Ecology” and an environmental ethic. So it is not wrong to drink any form of milk! It is the way the milk is collected. There is this western MYTH that infiltrated our psyche claiming that milk is unhealthy and causing cruelty in the production. Firstly, it is the pasteurization and homogenization that is killing us and creating allergies and gut problems. You can Google evidence for my claims. Secondly, I agree that many animals are kept in cruel conditions for milking and have their calves taken. This is too general a statement. That inductive reasoning is fallacious.
Camels milk is produced quite differently. I have visited many camel farms that produce milk and they are free range, stress-free and the calves are only taken for short periods, if at all.
An important environmental point is that “soft hooved” animals (camels) are far more environmentally sustainable than “hard hooved” animals.
It is well documented the medicinal properties of camel’s milk! Please research. It is this symbiotic, beautiful relationship that I am talking about. There does not have to be cruelty. Understand through Science what the non-human world, the sentient and non-sentient world has to offer is magnificent and awe inspiring. Many of our medical discoveries and medicines have been achieved this way. That is why we need to embrace and nurture, not have “dominion over”.
I am, for the most part, a vegetarian. I only eat what I can kill. Chicken and fish. I drink camel’s milk straight from the camel. I try and reduce and be aware of my carbon footprint. I do this as I am responsible for my health and well being and try not to consume too much of the health dollar. I am extremely healthy and strong in comparison to many of similar age. Food is medicine and we ought to understand this.
Finally, Simpson your opinion (and that is all it is) if fraught with paradoxes and smacks of “yuppie” ideology, giving very little understanding not only of poor countries that are kept alive on camels milk but furthermore the wonderful life-enhancing gifts that the beloved camel has to offer.”

 

Camel Journey~ Some More Updates from Australia

In previous article I told you about the camel work in Australia shared by Hannah Purs. Here are some more updates by her again. She wrote as;

Camel Introduction to Australia

Camels were introduced and adapted by Afghan cameleers in Australia. That time almost 20000 camels along with 2000 cameleers were brought to Australia for different purposes of work. The details can be seen in the link below.

http://www.cameleers.net/

Australia is blessed to be home to the world’s largest population of free roaming dromedary camels, animals that have been effectively quarantined against typical camel ailments found in the rest of the world since the early 1900s. In 2008 Desert Knowledge, an Alice Springs based organization, put together an estimate of wild camel numbers in Australia, they spread far and wide that there was around 1 million camels in Australia. Later on camel shooting suggestion came on the ground.20150225_111411

For details please go to the link;

http://www.businessinsider.com.au/some-bad-advice-on-wild-camel-numbers-may-have-cost-the-federal-government-millions-in-cash-exports-and-jobs-2013-11

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Camel Milk for Australia

Camel milk is in such high demand in Australia that it was being resold at $200 a litre on Gumtree (on online trading site) in November 2014. There is anecdotal and scientific evidence suggesting that camel milk can be invaluable in treating a number of diseases; from autoimmune issues to diabetes and renal problems to autism to therapy for those with cancer. Hannah Training Camel from DairyA camel milk project was then desigend and implemented to harvest this untapped resource of camel milk in Australia. This project has constantly reassessed its targets.

For details, please go to the link below.

http://www.camelmilkaus.com

In an email, she wrote further as concluding remarks as ‘

Some of the challenges that we’ve faced so far are:
Local people not wanting camels in the area
Government legislation changes
The cost of starting a dairy
Achievements:
Developing a training method which allows us to train camels very fast with no ropes or halters
Creating conversation within the Australian media about camels and their value

Camel Journey ~ From its Original Habitat to Modern World

Camel role is incredible in its cradle of domestication and its original habitats. In the 19th Century, some camels were transported to USA, Australia, and some other places for work and armies. After automobile revolution, the role of the camel as a beast of burden was gradually diminished 1,2.

In Australia there are thousands of feral camels, now it’s estimated a million, roaming across Australian deserts but unfortunately considered as a pest. Government launches project to kill camel (considering as a pest) and save the scarce water resources in the region 3. Many friends from Australia and other parts of the world (including the author) raised voice to halt such killing which results in wastage of such a unique resource. The camel activists gave many good arguments/suggestions to save feral camel; a tool to adapt to the climate change and judiciously use of the scattered bushy vegetation of the region 4. Unfortunately, there are still many challenges, the main one is the weak faith and poor understanding of the present Australian government on the onset of climate change 5.

I appreciate the role of the colleagues and friends around the world who raised voice for the conservation of camel in Australia and converting camel from a useless animal to the best tool for adaptation to climate change and ensuring food security. Now my dream about camel ‘Turning from a beast of burden to a modern farm animal’ is turning true 6Camel is Turning from a Beast of Burden to a Modern Farm Animal

In this series of articles, I am starting to share links, photographs, and views of the people around the world, who floated the idea to sustainable use of camel for the well being of humanity. Modern science also proved the role of the camel in all aspects especially, food security, sustainability, resilience and adaptation to climate change and human health. All friends and colleagues are warmly welcome to freely review, comments, share in this series of knowledge sharing.

As a first innovation, I hereby share pictures sent by Hannah Purs from Australia. I hope she will respond to reviewers.

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Hannah Training Camel from Dairy

Camel Feeding on Hay

SONY DSC
Feral camels are gathered by Helicopter

References 

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Camel_Corps
  2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_feral_camel
  3. http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/06/09/australia-considers-killing-camels-to-tackle-climate-change/
  4. http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/news/hannah-purss-embarks-on-2000km-camels-for-drought-relief-trek-along-oodnadatta-track/story-fngr8gwi-1226926025959
  5. http://rt.com/news/256861-climate-change-un-hoax/
  6. https://camel4milk.wordpress.com/2014/11/01/camel-is-turning-from-a-beast-of-burden-to-a-modern-farm-animal/